Weirdness

Wednesday, June 07, 2006

1st The Chick on the Roller Coaster, Now This!

Why are hairy legs on a woman a turn on?

Minding my own biz when this woman walks into the mailroom. High heels, slim bodied, killer weave, form fitting, low cut, high split dress. A looker for sure. Legs are hairy but I’m not repulsed. What the hell is wrong with me? And why am I in a quandry over this in the 1st place? Am I a victim of the white beauty standard? Or maybe I’’m some kinda horny, neanderthal, fetish dude.

Why don’t some women shave their stems? I’ve noticed this particular lady before and I’ve never seen them hairless. But it’s ok (I guess). This isn’t the 1st time I’ve fallen for a tarantulla woman. But I like ‘em smoothe and hairless too. (Still talking about legs). Does this make me some kinda Bi-something? I’m so confused.

Posted by cricket on 06/07 at 12:50 PM
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Thursday, April 13, 2006

WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE SANDWICH:  $148.33

I don’t know about this one...Just give me a couple of slices of bread and tuna fish and I am satisfied, (my stomach and pocket)!

The Associated Press / Tom Hevezi

What is claimed to be the world’s most expensive sandwich goes on display at Selfridges Department Store in London on Monday. Named the McDonald Sandwich, after it’s creator, chef Scott McDonald, the ingredients are Wagyu beef, fresh lobe foie gras, black truffle mayonnaise, brie de meaux, rocket, red pepper and mustard confit, and English plum tomatoes, all packed into 24-hour fermented sour dough bread - and it sells for 85 pounds ($148.33, 122.53 euro) each.

Posted by CHANNI on 04/13 at 09:29 AM
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Friday, March 31, 2006

Two teens exploit themselves and face jail time.

How can these girls be charged with child prnography?  They certainly chould be charged with bad taste and whupped to within an inch of their last breath, but to charge them with exploiting themselves?!  I just don’t get it.

If I may expand this somewhat logically, if I kill myself can I be charged with murder? 
Or, if I look at a reflection of myself after bathing, can I be charged with lewd behaviour?
Will bathing now cause me to be accused of molestation?
How about if I go to the mall (I hate the mall and don’t like going there), can I then be charged with kidnapping?

PROVIDENCE, R.I. --Two teenage girls face child pornography charges after posting sexually explicit photographs of themselves on the Internet.
Article Tools

The pornographic pictures of Elizabeth Muller, 19, of North Smithfield, and an unidentified 16-year-old Lincoln girl were discovered on MySpace.com, a social networking Web site, said a spokesman for the attorney general’s office.

The photos of the two teenagers together were posted on each of their respective Web site accounts, spokesman Michael Healey said.

The 16-year-old was arraigned before a Family Court judge Monday on a charge of child pornography and violating a court-ordered curfew, Healey said. The girl is being held at the Rhode Island Training School pending a probable cause hearing Friday, he said.

Muller was also charged with child pornography and was arraigned in District Court in Providence.

A police officer assigned to Lincoln High School, where the girl was a student, discovered the photographs while monitoring the Web site
http://www.boston.com/news/local/rhode_island/articles/2006/03/29/two_teens_face_child_pornography_charges/

Posted by SPN on 03/31 at 10:54 AM
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Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Those crazy penises … What to do when they get in the way.

http://www.suntimes.com/

Man severs own penis, throws it at officers

Before cops threw the book at him, Jakub Fik threw something unusual at them—his penis.

Fik, 33, cut off his own penis during a Northwest Side rampage Wednesday morning. When confronted by police, Fik hurled several knives and his severed organ at the officers, police said. Officers stunned him with a Taser and took him into custody.

“We took him out without any serious injury, with the exception of his own,” said Chicago Police Sgt. Edward Dolan of the 16th District.

Doctors at Northwestern Memorial Hospital reattached Fik’s penis Wednesday, sources said. He was listed in good condition Thursday, according to hospital spokesman Andrew Buchanan, who declined to comment further.

Fik, who lives in the 5400 block of W. Berenice, is charged with two counts of aggravated assault and one count of criminal damage to property, said Officer Laura Kubiak. He told paramedics he was distraught over problems with his girlfriend in Poland, Dolan said.

Police arrived on Fik’s block at 8:20 a.m. Wednesday after receiving reports he was smashing car windows, Dolan said. Fik then broke into a house down the block. A group of six or seven officers assembled in front of the house, Dolan said.

Fik was bleeding when the officers arrived and may have already cut off his organ, Dolan said.

“At that point, this guy came running out, naked, with a handful of knives . . . and started throwing knives at the police officers that were 10, 20, 30 feet away,” Dolan said.

Fik threw his penis during the confrontation, too, Dolan said. He then went back into the house and re-emerged with “another handful of knives,” Dolan said.

Dolan sneaked to the side of the bungalow’s front steps and stunned Fik with the Taser. Fik fought back when officers went to restrain him, Dolan said.

“About 10 feet from the front porch, right on the sidewalk, was his penis,” Dolan said.

Dr. Greg Bales, associate professor of urology at the University of Chicago, said severed penises are uncommon but surgery usually works.

“As long as the penis is placed on ice and reattached within a few hours, the success is usually pretty good,” Bales said.

Posted by SPN on 03/22 at 05:59 PM
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Friday, March 10, 2006

Those crazy Russian porn hounds.  What will they think of next?

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1752415.html

Russian to take porn mags to the grave

A Russian pensioner has designed his own coffin to include space for his prized collection of porn mags.

Vladimir Villisov decided to have a special coffin made after surviving a heart attack and realising he did not want to leave the magazines behind.

“The girls in those magazines have been my companions for years, and I want them to accompany me to the next life,” said the unmarried 65-year-old from Mramorskoe.

He added that he even sometimes lies in his coffin, lined with red satin, to read his top shelf material, reported daily newspaper Utro.

Posted by SPN on 03/10 at 08:32 AM
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Monday, February 27, 2006

Yes Darla, there are religious extremists in the US of A.

Posted by SPN on 02/27 at 02:35 PM
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Wednesday, October 26, 2005

Those crazy Japanese.  What will they think of next?

That’s all I need now… my wife to rewire my headphones because I didn’t pick my socks up off of the floor.

http://www.cnn.com

ATSUGI, Japan (AP)—We wield remote controls to turn things on and off, make them advance, make them halt. Ground-bound pilots use remotes to fly drone airplanes, soldiers to maneuver battlefield robots.

But manipulating humans?

Prepare to be remotely controlled.

Just imagine being rendered the rough equivalent of a radio-controlled toy car.

Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp., Japans top telephone company, says it is developing the technology to perhaps make video games more realistic.

A special headset was placed on my cranium by my hosts during a recent demonstration at an NTT research center. It sent a very low voltage electric current from the back of my ears through my head—either from left to right or right to left, depending on which way the joystick on a remote-control was moved.

I found the experience unnerving and exhausting: I sought to step straight ahead but kept careening from side to side. Those alternating currents literally threw me off.

The technology is called galvanic vestibular stimulation—essentially, electricity messes with the delicate nerves inside the ear that help maintain balance.

I felt a mysterious, irresistible urge to start walking to the right whenever the researcher turned the switch to the right. I was convinced—mistakenly—that this was the only way to maintain my balance.

The phenomenon is painless but dramatic. Your feet start to move before you know it. I could even remote-control myself by taking the switch into my own hands.

There’s no proven-beyond-a-doubt explanation yet as to why people start veering when electricity hits their ear. But NTT researchers say they were able to make a person walk along a route in the shape of a giant pretzel using this technique.

It’s a mesmerizing sensation similar to being drunk or melting into sleep under the influence of anesthesia. But it’s more definitive, as though an invisible hand were reaching inside your brain.

NTT says the feature may be used in video games and amusement park rides, although there are no plans so far for a commercial product.

Some people really enjoy the experience, researchers said while acknowledging that others feel uncomfortable.

I watched a simple racing-car game demonstration on a large screen while wearing a device programmed to synchronize the curves with galvanic vestibular stimulation. It accentuated the swaying as an imaginary racing car zipped through a virtual course, making me wobbly.

Another program had the electric current timed to music. My head was pulsating against my will, getting jerked around on my neck. I became so dizzy I could barely stand. I had to turn it off.

NTT researchers suggested this may be a reflection of my lack of musical abilities. People in tune with freely expressing themselves love the sensation, they said.

“We call this a virtual dance experience although some people have mentioned it’s more like a virtual drug experience,” said Taro Maeda, senior research scientist at NTT. “I’m really hopeful Apple Computer will be interested in this technology to offer it in their iPod.”

Research on using electricity to affect human balance has been going on around the world for some time.

James Collins, professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University, has studied using the technology to prevent the elderly from falling and to help people with an impaired sense of balance. But he also believes the effect is suited for games and other entertainment.

“I suspect they’ll probably get a kick out of the illusions that can be created to give them a more total immersion experience as part of virtual reality,” Collins said.

The very low level of electricity required for the effect is unlikely to cause any health damage, Collins said. Still, NTT required me to sign a consent form, saying I was trying the device at my own risk.

And risk definitely comes to mind when playing around with this technology.

Timothy Hullar, assistant professor at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., believes finding the right way to deliver an electromagnetic field to the ear at a distance could turn the technology into a weapon for situations where “killing isn’t the best solution.”

“This would be the most logical situation for a nonlethal weapon that presumably would make your opponent dizzy,” he said via e-mail. “If you find just the right frequency, energy, duration of application, you would hope to find something that doesn’t permanently injure someone but would allow you to make someone temporarily off-balance.”

Indeed, a small defense contractor in Texas, Invocon Inc., is exploring whether precisely tuned electromagnetic pulses could be safely fired into people’s ears to temporarily subdue them.

NTT has friendlier uses in mind.

If the sensation of movement can be captured for playback, then people can better understand what a ballet dancer or an Olympian gymnast is doing, and that could come handy in teaching such skills.

And it may also help people dodge oncoming cars or direct a rescue worker in a dark tunnel, NTT researchers say. They maintain that the point is not to control people against their will.

If you’re determined to fight the suggestive orders from the electric currents by clinging to a fence or just lying on your back, you simply won’t move.

But from my experience, if the currents persist, you’d probably be persuaded to follow their orders. And I didn’t like that sensation. At all.

Posted by SPN on 10/26 at 01:09 PM
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Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Those crazy Italians!  What will they think of next?

Artists erect giant pink bunny on mountain

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_1541732.html
Artists erect giant pink bunny on mountain

An enormous pink bunny has been erected on an Italian mountainside where it will stay for the next 20 years.
387500.jpg

The 200-foot-long toy rabbit lies on the side of the 5,000 foot high Colletto Fava mountain in northern Italy’s Piedmont region.

Viennese art group Gelatin designed the giant soft toy and say it was “knitted by dozens of grannies out of pink wool”.

Group member Wolfgang Gantner said: “It’s supposed to make you feel small, like Gulliver. You walk around it and you can’t help but smile.”

And Gelatin members say the bunny is not just for walking around - they are expecting hikers to climb its 20 foot sides and relax on its belly.

The giant rabbit is expected to remain on the mountain side until 2025.

Posted by SPN on 09/21 at 12:02 PM
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Thursday, September 15, 2005

Those crazy Chinese.  What will they think of next?

On second thought, my body cream is made from the PLACENTAL EXTRACT of whales and other mammals.  Huh?  HUH?!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,1568467,00.html

∑ Cosmetics firm targets UK market ∑
Lack of regulation puts users at risk

Ian Cobain and Adam Luck
Tuesday September 13, 2005
The Guardian

A Chinese cosmetics company is using skin harvested from the corpses of executed convicts to develop beauty products for sale in Europe, an investigation by the Guardian has discovered.
Agents for the firm have told would-be customers it is developing collagen for lip and wrinkle treatments from skin taken from prisoners after they have been shot. The agents say some of the company’s products have been exported to the UK, and that the use of skin from condemned convicts is “traditional” and nothing to “make such a big fuss about”.

With European regulations to control cosmetic treatments such as collagen not expected for several years, doctors and politicians say the discovery highlights the dangers faced by the increasing number of Britons seeking to improve their looks. Apart from the ethical concerns, there is also the potential risk of infection.

MPs on the Commons select health committee are to examine the regulatory system and may launch an investigation and question ministers about the need for immediate new controls. “I am sure that the committee will want to look at this,” said Kevin Barron, its Labour chairman. “This is something everyone in society will be very concerned about.”

Plastic surgeons are also concerned about the delay in introducing regulations to control the cosmetic treatments industry. Norman Waterhouse, a former president of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, said: “I am surprised that we are taking the lead from the European commission, because this is bound to delay action on this important area which is increasingly a matter for concern. It seems like a bit of a cop out to me.”

It is unclear whether any of the “aesthetic fillers” such as collagen available in the UK or on the internet are supplied by the company, which cannot be identified for legal reasons. It is also unclear whether collagen made from prisoners’ skin is in the research stage or is in production. However, the Guardian has learned that the company has exported collagen products to the UK in the past. An agent told customers it had also exported to the US and European countries, and that it was trying to develop fillers using tissue from aborted foetuses.

Traditional

When formally approached by the Guardian, the agent denied the company was using skin harvested from executed prisoners. However, he had already admitted it was doing precisely this during a number of conversations with a researcher posing as a Hong Kong businessman. The Press Complaints Commission’s code of practice permits subterfuge if there is no other means of investigating a matter of public interest.

The agent told the researcher: “A lot of the research is still carried out in the traditional manner using skin from the executed prisoner and aborted foetus.” This material, he said, was being bought from “bio tech” companies based in the northern province of Heilongjiang, and was being developed elsewhere in China.

He suggested that the use of skin and other tissues harvested from executed prisoners was not uncommon. “In China it is considered very normal and I was very shocked that western countries can make such a big fuss about this,” he said. Speaking from his office in northern China, he added: “The government has put some pressure on all the medical facilities to keep this type of work in low profile.”

The agent said his company exported to the west via Hong Kong."We are still in the early days of selling these products, and clients from abroad are quite surprised that China can manufacture the same human collagen for less than 5% of what it costs in the west.” Skin from prisoners used to be even less expensive, he said. “Nowadays there is a certain fee that has to be paid to the court.”

The agent’s admission comes after an inquiry into the cosmetic surgery industry in Britain, commissioned by the Department of Health, pointed to the need for new regulations controlling collagen treatments. Sir Liam Donaldson, the chief medical officer, has highlighted the inquiry’s concerns about the use of cadavers for cosmetic treatments. “Cosmetic procedures are a rapidly growing area of private health care,” he said. “We must ensure we properly protect patients’ safety by improving the training and regulation.”

The DoH has agreed to the inquiry’s recommendations, but is waiting for the European commission to draw up proposals for laws governing cosmetic products. It could be several years before this legislation takes force.

Meanwhile, cosmetic treatments, including those with with aesthetic fillers, are growing rapidly in popularity, with around 150,000 injections or implants administered each year in the UK. Lip enhancement treatments are one of the most popular, costing an average of 170.

Some fillers are made from cattle or pig tissue, and others from humans. The DoH believes that there may be a risk of transmission of blood-borne viruses and even vCJD from collagen containing human tissue. Although there is as yet no evidence that this has happened, the inquiry found that some collagen injections had triggered inflammatory reactions causing permanent discomfort, scarring and disfigurement. In their report, the inquiry team said that if there was a risk, “action should be taken to protect patient safety through regulation”.

While new regulations are to be drawn up, the department is currently powerless to regulate most human-tissue fillers intended for injection or implant, as they occupy a legal grey area. Most products are not governed by regulations controlling medical products, as they are not classified as medicines. They also escape cosmetics regulations, which only apply to substances used on the surface of the skin and not those injected beneath it. The Healthcare Commission is planning new regulations for cosmetic surgery clinics next year, but these will not control the substances used by plastic surgeons.

Hand transplants

A number of plastic surgeons have told the Guardian that they have been hearing rumours about the use of tissue harvested from executed prisoners for several years.

Peter Butler, a consultant plastic surgeon and government adviser, said there had been rumours that Chinese surgeons had performed hand transplants using hands from executed prisoners. One transplant centre was believed to be adjacent to an execution ground. “I can see the utility of it, as they have access and no ethical objection,” he said. “The main concern would be infective risk.”

Andrew Lee of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who has visited China to examine transplant techniques, said he had heard similar rumours.

Manufacturers of aesthetic fillers said they had seen Chinese collagen products on sale at trade fairs, but had not seen any labelled Chinese-made in the UK. Dan Cohen, whose US-based company, Inamed, produces collagen products, said: “We have come across Chinese products in the market place. But most products from China are being sold ‘off-label’ or are being imported illegally.”

In China, authorities deny that prisoners’ body parts are harvested without their consent. However, there is some evidence to suggest it may be happening.

In June 2001, Wang Guoqi, a Chinese former military physician, told US congressmen he had worked at execution grounds helping surgeons to harvest the organs of more than 100 executed prisoners, without prior consent. The surgeons used converted vans parked near the execution grounds to begin dissecting the bodies, he told the house international relations committee’s human rights panel.

Skin was said to be highly valued for the treatment of burn victims, and Dr Wang said that in 1995 he skinned a shot convict’s body while the man’s heart was still beating. Dr Wang, who was seeking asylum in the US, also alleged that corneas and other body tissue were removed for transplant, and said his hospital, the Tianjin paramilitary police general brigade hospital, sold body parts for profit.

Human rights activists in China have repeatedly claimed that organs have been harvested from the corpses of executed prisoners and sold to surgeons offering transplants to fee-paying foreigners.

Dr Wang’s allegations infuriated the Chinese authorities, and in a rare move officials publicly denounced him as a liar. The government said organs were transplanted from executed prisoners only if they and their family gave consent.

Although the exact number of people facing the death penalty in China is an official secret, Amnesty International believes around 3,400 were executed last year, with a further 6,000 on death row.

What is it?

Collagen is a major structural protein found in abundance in skin, bones, tendons and other connective tissue. Matted sheets of collagen give skin its toughness and by winding into molecular “cables”, it adds strength to tendons.

What is it used for?

Collagen injections are used in cosmetic surgery to plump up lips and flatten out wrinkles. After botox, collagen injections are the second-most popular cosmetic operations in Britain. Collagen does not have a permanent effect and several injections are often needed.

What else is it good for?

Collagen was being put to good use as far back as the stone age. Neolithic cave dwellers around the Dead Sea are believed to have used it as a primitive form of glue some 8,000 years ago. More recently, researchers have developed a form that can be poured or injected into wounds to seal them.

Where does it come from?

A number of sources. Some companies extract it from cow skin and treat it to minimise the risk of allergic reactions or infection. Others collect it from human donors or extract cells from the patient before growing the necessary amount in a laboratory.

Is it safe?

Collagen can cause allergic reactions if it has not been treated correctly, and there is a theoretical risk of disease being passed on. A small amount of collagen is often injected into the skin a few weeks before treatment to test for possible allergic reactions. Earlier this year, Sir Liam Donaldson warned that collagen injections could spread conditions such as hepatitis and variant CJD, the human form of mad cow disease.

Posted by SPN on 09/15 at 11:07 AM
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Those crazy Germans.  What will they think of next?

On second thought, that isn’t such a crazy idea.  My car runs on dead lizards.  Huh?  HUH?!

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/09/14/germany.catfuel.reut/index.html

BERLIN, Germany (Reuters)—A German inventor has angered animal rights activists with his answer to fighting the soaring cost of fuel—dead cats.

Christian Koch, 55, from the eastern county of Saxony, told Bild newspaper that his organic diesel fuel—a homemade blend of garbage, run-over cats and other ingredients—is a proven alternative to normal consumer diesel.

“I drive my normal diesel-powered car with this mixture,” Koch said. “I have gone 170,000 km (106,000 miles) without a problem.”

The Web site of Koch’s firm, “Alphakat GmbH”, says his patented “KDV 500” machine can produce what he calls the “bio-diesel” fuel at about 23 euro cents (30 cents) a liter, which is about one-fifth the price at petrol stations now.

Koch said around 20 dead cats added into the mix could help produce enough fuel to fill up a 50-liter (11 gallon) tank.

But the president of the German Society for the Protection of Animals, Wolfgang Apel, said using dead cats for fuel was illegal.

“There’s no danger for cats and dogs in Germany because this practice is outlawed in Germany,” Apel told Bild on Wednesday in a story entitled “Can you really make fuel out of cats?”

“We’re going to keep an eye on this case,” Apel said.

Posted by SPN on 09/15 at 09:04 AM
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